Giorgio Armani, 1989

Giorgio Armani Fall 1989 campaign by Aldo Fallai

The relationship between designer Giorgio Armani and photographer Aldo Fallai is perhaps one of the most defining in fashion. Fallai’s lens translated Armani’s sometimes abstract approach to dressing into something real and tangible — an experience the viewer can reference themself, an ideal they can relate to. In his 1989 menswear campaign this synergy and unique relationship produced some of Armani’s most distinct imagery. Without a location, props, or extras to stage a narrative, Fallai evoked what was inherent in the clothes and only in the clothes in order to tell the story.

The melange of texture,  the palette of tinted and muted colors posing as neutrals, and the basic luxury of a sumptuous fabric are all that frame the model’s affectations, his body language, his gaze, and his confidence. They provide the only context for this man and his world and it is more than convincing. This approach to image making and even the clothes themselves might be considered sparse or perhaps minimal. But if you look between the lines and read the fine print, it is nothing if it isn’t opulent.

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2 responses to “Giorgio Armani, 1989

  1. Where did you find these ads ? The texture of the clothes is fantastic. I rarely find old items from the 90s on ebay. There was more freedom in advertising, those days. Less marketing and more authenticity. Emporio has now such a polished and flat image .for the Chinese market.

  2. These ads are great, and you can find the originals on http://www.addall.com/used by searching for the excellent Armani catalogue book published by electa for the 1989/90 autumn fall winter collection. He did a great run of these catalogue books for the next 6 or 7 years until budgets got cut back. The best ads fallai did for Armani though were from 1976-80, published principally in the feb/mar/apr & aug/sep/oct issues of l’uomo vogue and vogue italia – years ahead of their time, and hugely influential You could run them today

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